Irish Folk Music Feat - Caoineadh Songs Fans of the hit tv series, "Duck Dynasty," can be on the lookout for their first musical release. "Duck the Halls: A Robertson Family Christmas" will be their upcoming Christmas album to be released by Universal Nashville on October 29, 2013. Next up nature decided it too was a Lefty, because here comes that bitch, Katrina. The wind and rain did little damage and the bullet was dodged. Oil platforms were not wrecked beyond repair. The port facilities were not rendered destroyed, but that bitch Katrina had an ace up her sleeve. Once you have an idea of how much space you require, you can go about choosing the right size. It is generally helpful to have a per person estimation of space in square feet. This can help you work out how much space you will need depending on the number of people expected. The space required per person, for a buffet-event wristbands is likely to be smaller than that needed for a seated event. The next band I spoke with was Company. Company is a self-described indie rock sounding band. The band members are now living in Charleston, South Carolina. Used to playing empty bar rooms, Company is excited to be playing at the SXSW festival this year. Summary: With a grand total of 42 acts and counting, Mile High festival wristbands is going to be a tough act to follow. With two hometown bands in the line-up, 3OH!3 and The Fray, you will be hard pressed to find another festival swelling with pride. Dick"s Sporting Goods Park should accommodate festival goers quite easily, providing open space and lush grass. Think Glastonbury, U.K. During this phase, you should decide on the number of participants that you will be comfortable hosting. Are you visualizing a small group of less than 20 people? Or do you see yourself talking to a larger sport wristbands group perhaps in the hundreds? Bandslam: Not Yet Rated for some thematic elements and mild language. 111 mins. Vanessa Hudgens steps out of the shadow of High School Musical but not too far. An upstart band, led by a talented singer-songwriter (Aly Michalka) develops a sound of its own and is poised for success. As disaster strikes, the band must decide whether to give up or fight for what they believe in. Tip: Make sure you pick up a map even if you know your way around the park. You"ll need it for the unlimited cocoa and chocolate chip cookie stands located throughout the park!

 

Japanese master shoemaker Yohei Fukuda creates shoes in his workshop in Tokyo. Each pair takes between 120 and 140 hours. Kazuhiro Nogi / Agence Francepresse

TOKYO - When Yohei Fukuda left for England more than a decade ago to learn his trade as a master leather shoemaker, he could hardly have imagined that his native Japan would one day become a leader in this traditionally European art.

"The number of bespoke shoe workshops has been booming in Japan in the past few years," said the elegant-looking bald and mustachioed 37-year-old, sporting a smart shirt and tie under a dark-blue work apron.

"There are at least 40 in Tokyo today and maybe as many as 100 in the whole country," Fukuda said.

Bespoke leather shoemaking has historically been dominated by European artisans, but Japan developed a taste for the luxury footwear at the beginning of the 2000s and local manufacturing classes quickly took off.

Fukuda"s own workshop is located close to the upmarket area of Ometesando in Tokyo, often described as Japan"s answer to the grand Champs Elysee avenue in Paris.

There is not one machine in the whole place - everything is done by hand, from the precise measurement of a client"s feet to the delicate business of attaching the soles to the shoe.

"Each pair of shoes takes between 120 and 140 hours of work and we produce around 80 a year," explained Fukuda. He does not want to go at a faster pace. "I want to make good shoes," he said.

Fortunately, his customers are in no hurry and willing to pay a hefty price for the bespoke quality - a made-to-measure pair costs 480,000 yen ($4,200) at least.

"Japanese spirit"

Why Japan? Mari Yamaguchi, who teaches this meticulous trade in a private school in Tokyo said that bespoke shoes "speak to the Japanese spirit, with its sense of detail".

At Yamaguchi"s school, dozens of young students are bent over workbenches, carefully learning each one of the painstaking steps required in the manufacturing process.

"A foot is something very special. Each foot is unique, like each piece of leather. When making bespoke shoes by hand, the challenge is to get close to perfection by bringing together these two imperfect but magic elements," she said.

The Japanese have developed such a good reputation in the field that Western apprentices are now heading east to learn the trade.

In Fukuda"s workshop, five apprentices labor on workbenches made from old 1920s English chests of drawers.

One scrutinizes the quality of a new delivery of leather, another sews on a sole, making sweeping gestures with his arm every time he pulls the thread.

And these interns are in turn bringing their own Japanese-inspired creativity to the ancient tradition.

Clemence Rochard, a 27-year-old French apprentice, created a pair of handmade shoes made partly of leather and partly from material from a sparkling, flowery kimono she found in Kyoto.

"In Japan nobody would have thought about it," Fukuda said.

Agence France-presse